Course Descriptions For Main Campus Programs

Also See: Courses Offered on Demand

AGRI-121. Rodeo Techniques. 1 Hour. This course includes the history, agricultural importance and competitive sport aspects of rodeo. May be taken for credit four times.

AGRI-123. Applied Rodeo. 1 Hour. This is a comprehensive course in implementing the regulations, methods and techniques used in rodeo as a team sport. May be taken for credit four times. Prerequisite: Basic understanding of the skills involved.

AGRI-157. Agricultural Technology, Engineering, and Systems. 3 Hours. This course is an introduction to agricultural technology, engineering and agricultural systems. It will include application of physical and engineering problems in agriculture. Course may cover simple machines, natural resource management, machinery systems, equipment calibration, global positioning systems, geographical information systems, internal combustion engines, animal waste systems, electrical and erosion control. Prerequisite: College Algebra.

AGRI-170. Agriculture in Our Society. 2 Hours. This course is an orientation to curriculums and career opportunities in the Agriculture Industry. Emphasis will be on career planning as related to a chosen profession and agricultural community. The development of the agriculture industry will also be included as it pertains to career opportunities.

AGRI-171. Principles of Agricultural Economics. 4 Hours. This course is a study of economic principles as they relate to agriculture. Emphasis is on application of principles to the solution of farm, agribusiness and agricultural problems. Students will learn the basic micro and macroeconomic concepts needed for analysis and decision-making. The course includes three credit hours of lecture and one credit hour of lab.

AGRI-172. Principles of Animal Science. 3 Hours. This course looks at what animal science is today. This course shows how animals fit into all of society and how animals contribute to the well being of humans from a worldwide perspective. This course explores uses that humans have found for our domesticated animals in addition to food and food uses. It explores traditional livestock but also companion animals, aquaculture, llamoids, rabbits and careers associated with animal science. It also explores food safety, consumer concerns and animal welfare rights.

AGRI-173. Agricultural Seminar. 2 Hours. Practical work experience in an agriculture field or related business. Extent of experience will include an appropriate number of classroom and practical experience hours under supervision of the instructor and/or cooperating employer. This will include practical training in all areas of the business which lend to the student's occupational objectives. Permission of the instructor and cooperation of desired employer are needed.

AGRI-180. Animal Science and Industry. 1 Hour. This course is a study of the types and classes of market and breeding livestock. This class is a lab that accompanies Principles of Animal Science. It includes animal nomenclature and terminology and comparison of live market and their carcasses. Prerequisite: Principles of Animal Science or concurrent enrollment.

AGRI-181. Livestock Selection I. 3 Hours. This is a beginning course in evaluation of animals for slaughter and breeding. It involves the comparison among animals in beef, swine and sheep. It includes developing and presenting written and oral reasons. Members of the Livestock Judging Team are selected from this course; this involves a combination of 5-6 hours lecture, laboratory and activity per week.

AGRI-227. Agricultural Internship. 2 Hours. Supervised experience in an agribusiness consisting of on-the-job training at a selected workstation under the supervision of a coordinator is required for the course. Students will be required to complete a report of their job experiences and hours worked. Prerequisite:
Enrollment in Agribusiness Program.

AGRI-260. Agricultural Construction. 3 Hours. The course is designed to provide students with the theoretical basis, knowledge and skills necessary for the construction/fabrication of metal projects. Emphasis will be placed on: laboratory safety, general laboratory measurements, metal identification/characteristics, oxyacetylene welding and cutting, shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), gas metal arc welding (GMAW), gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), plasma cutting, and project construction.

AGRI-262. Agricultural Structures. 2 Hours. This course is designed to provide students with the theoretical basis, knowledge and skills necessary for the construction/fabrication of agricultural structure type projects. Emphasis will be placed on: laboratory safety, general laboratory measurements, material selection, basic construction techniques, electrical theory and operation, plumbing theory and operation, concrete theory and construction, and basic surveying. The course will include one hour of lecture and two hours of laboratory.

AGRI-264. Agricultural Power. 2 Hours. This course is designed to provide students with the theoretical basis, knowledge and skills necessary for the repair and maintenance of small gas engines and basic hydraulic systems. Emphasis will be placed on: laboratory safety, general laboratory measurements, engine operation, compression, fuel, governor, electrical, cooling, lubrication systems, engine troubleshooting and basic hydraulics. The course will include one hour of lecture and two hours of laboratory.

AGRI-270. Soils. 4 Hours. Fundamental chemistry, physical and biological properties of soils; their formation, fertility and management are included. The course includes three credit hours of lecture and one credit hour of lab. Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Chemistry or Principles of Chemistry I.

AGRI-280. Entomology. 3 Hours. This course is designed to promote an understanding of major elements of general entomology and relate them to modern principles of insect pest management. Basic fundamentals of insects, insect structures, and functions along with basic classifications of economically important insects and how they impact society will be studied.

AGRI-290. Animal Nutrition and Feeding. 4 Hours. Fundamental principles of animal nutrition including digestion, absorption and metabolism of the various food nutrients will be discussed. Ration formulation, measure of body needs and characteristics of the nutrients will be included. The course includes three credit hours of lecture and one credit hour of lab. Prerequisite: Principles of Animal Science, Chemistry preferred.

AGRI-292. Meat Science. 3 Hours. This course is a study of all phases of the meat industry with major emphasis on the animal processing sequence, muscle composition and product quality. It includes promotion, merchandising and marketing of meat products as well as basic evaluation techniques. Prerequisite: Principles of Animal Science.

AGRI-293. Principles of Meat Evaluation. 3 Hours. This course takes a modern look at the evaluation of carcasses. Emphasis is on carcass grading and evaluation and appraisal of meat. The course includes techniques for comparative analysis of meat carcasses.

 ARTS-110. Photography I. 3 Hours. This is an introductory course designed to acquaint the beginning student with the materials and techniques of 35mm black and white photography. The course entails instruction in the use of the camera and use of the darkroom facilities for developing and printing. Ownership of, or ready access to, a 35mm hand camera is required of each student. Emphasis in this course is placed on photography as a means of artistic expression.

ARTS-140. Art History and Appreciation I. 3 Hours. This is a survey lecture course covering the development of art and architecture in Western culture from prehistoric times to the 18th century. It includes a study of the basic principles and problems of the visual arts along with major historical trends and periods. The relationship between artistic development and cultural changes are also discussed.

ARTS-141. Art History and Appreciation II. 3 Hours. This is a survey lecture course covering the development of art and architecture in Western culture from the 18th century to contemporary times. Emphasis is on the development of Modern Art and its relationship to the cultural movements of the time in addition to its influence on the present culture. Prerequisite: Art History and Appreciation I or consent of instructor.

ARTS-142. Introduction to Design I. 3 Hours. A basic studio art class introducing the fundamental principles of two-dimensional composition. Emphasis will be on the creative and expressive use of these principles as a means of visual communication.

ARTS-144. Painting I. 3 Hours. A basic studio course examining the fundamentals of painting with oil paints. The history and basic techniques are explored. The making of a pallet and use of the pallet are stressed. Emphasis on understanding these principles will be applied throughout the course using the still-life. Color theory and composition are emphasized.

ARTS-145. Crafts. 3 Hours. A basic studio course which introduces various studio techniques commonly used by artists in expressing an idea. The basic fundamentals are explored in two-dimensional and three-dimensional mediums. Painting, drawing, ceramics, printmaking and various crafts are explored. Emphasis will be on craftsmanship and use of the studio.

ARTS-147. Drawing I. 3 Hours. An introductory studio course examining the basic fundamentals of drawing: line, value, form, gesture and spatial illusions. Emphasis will be on understanding and applying these basic principles through a variety of projects and exercises using charcoal, conte crayon and ebony pencil.

ARTS-150. Ceramics I. 3 Hours. An introductory studio course emphasizing three hand-built pottery techniques: pinch, slab and coil. Basic surface, glaze and firing techniques are covered along with a brief introduction to the history of ceramics.

ARTS-152. Elementary Art. 3 Hours. This course provides a survey of concepts, theories and experiences for appreciating teaching art. It will enable the future elementary art teacher to develop educational art units and lesson plans for the classroom. This is accomplished by imparting theoretical knowledge and experiencing practical applications.

ARTS-155. Cinematic Traditions: Film Genres. 3 Hours. A critical survey of the accomplishments of artists and craftspeople in the relatively short history of film making, a record of creative collaborations which changed critical and commercial perceptions of visual art and storytelling will be featured in this course.

ARTS-207. Sculpture I. 3 Hours. An introductory studio course focusing on the creative development and use of three-dimensional visual activity. Emphasis will be on the basic principles of three-dimensional composition and the expressive possibilities of sculptural form and space.

ARTS-210. Photography II. 3 Hours. This is an advanced photography course designed to encourage and help the student to gain and develop further insight toward what a photograph potentially is. 35 mm black and white photography will be the base format of the class using a single lense reflex camera. However, a pin hole camera and photograms will be explored as well. Emphasis in this course is placed on photography as a means of artistic expression. Ownership of, or ready access to, a 35 mm manual camera is required of each student. Prerequisite: Photography I.

ARTS-244. Painting II. 3 Hours. This is an advanced course in painting addressing issues of the still-life, portrait, landscape and abstraction using oil paints. Students will focus on developing content and personal expression. Note: This course is a continuation of the concepts approached in Painting I. Prerequisite: Painting I or consent of the instructor.

ARTS-247. Drawing II. 3 Hours. This is an advanced and continuation course of Drawing I. During the semester the student will be required to work on both more "finished work" and experimental drawings. The student will be required to turn in a certain number of drawings three times during the semester for individual critique. This is a studio course, and instruction will occur both on an individual basis and as a group. Strong emphasis will be placed on the experimental and life drawing. Prerequisite: Drawing I or permission of the instructor.

ARTS-250. Ceramics II. 3 Hours. A continuation of Ceramics I with the introduction of the potter's wheel as a clay forming tool. Clay and glaze formulation will be explored. Emphasis will be on the creative development of surface and form using an earthenware clay body.

BIOL-101. General Biology. 5 Hours. This is an introductory course designed to teach the relationship of humans to other living things, as well as the basic chemistry, physics and physiology associated with living things. This course is appropriate for both majors and non-majors who wish to further their education concerning life (bios) in general. The course includes three credit hours of lecture and two credit hours of lab.

BIOL-103. Environmental Science. 5 Hours. A basic ecological approach to the diversity of life forms in various environments, and the impacts of human activities on these environments will be studied. Causes of and solutions to air and water pollution, soil erosion and pest problems, loss of biodiversity, deforestation, energy depletion and possible climate changes are featured. It includes discussion of remedy techniques, risk assessment and environmental legislation. Laboratory activities and field trips demonstrate principles discussed in class. The course includes three credit hours of lecture and two credit hours of lab.

BIOL-105. Principles of Heredity. 3 Hours. This course focuses on the laws and theories of heredity with emphasis on man. It will include the study of the structure and function of genes and the process by which genes are transferred from one generation to the next.

BIOL-111. Wildlife Biology. 3 Hours. An introduction to important wild mammal, bird and fish species and the ecological principles upon which wildlife conservation management is based. Habitat needs and  manipulations, animal behavior, hunting and fishing regulations and protection of endangered wildlife are included. Three hours lecture per week, plus 8 two-hour field studies of wildlife in various habitats. Offered as needed.

BIOL-113. Environmental Science: Honors. 5 Hours. A basic ecological approach to the diversity of life  forms in various environments, and the impacts of human activities on these environments will be studied. Causes of and solutions to air and water pollution, soil erosion and pest problems, loss of biodiversity, deforestation, energy depletion and possible climate changes are featured. It includes discussion of remediation techniques, risk assessment and environmental legislation. Laboratory activities and field trips demonstrate principles discussed in class. Students will read and discuss various conflicting opinions on environmental problems and solutions. The course includes three credit hours of lecture and two credit hours of lab. Prerequisites: Enrollees must be members of the CCC Honors Program, or obtain permission from the Honors Program Coordinator.

BIOL-203. Anatomy and Physiology. 5 Hours. This course covers the study of the structure and functions of the parts of the human body. The course includes three credit hours of lecture and two credit hours of lab. Prerequisite: General Biology or permission of instructor.

BIOL-204. Microbiology. 5 Hours. This is a beginning course in the study of microorganisms, designed to acquaint the student with various forms of bacteria, fungi, protozoa and algae. Morphology, life cycles, metabolism and economic importance of microorganisms are stressed. The course includes three credit hours of lecture and two credit hours of perequisite: General Biology or permission of the instructor.

BIOL-205. Field Biology. 3 Hours. This course uses lecture and field techniques used in classification, identification and ecology of the regional flora, fauna and geological features of the region. Field work will also concentrate on study of fresh water systems including field studies of bacteria, fungi and parasites and the significance of the various groups. Methods of collection and treating specimens for isolation will be included.

BIOL-206. Biology I: Cellular and Molecular Biology. 5 Hours. This is the first in a series of two introductory biology classes designed for majors to fulfill an introductory biology requirement. Coursework includes the study of basic biological principles, basic chemistry, cell structures and functions, metabolism, photosynthesis, cellular reproduction, genetics, and biotechnology. By studying these areas, the student is
exposed to the major fields of biological study.

BIOL-208. Biology II: Organismic Biology. 5 Hours. This is the second in a series of introductory biology classes designed for majors to fulfill their introductory biology requirement. Coursework includes the study of evolution, behavior and ecology, the diversity of life, and plant structure and function. By studying these areas, the student is exposed to the major fields of biological study. Prerequisite: Biology I: Cellular and
Molecular Biology or permission of instructor.

BIOL-210. Pathophysiology. 3 Hours. This course is designed for the study of the human body. Aspects specifically covered in this course will include the body functions and abnormalities resulting from various human diseases. Prerequisite: General Biology or permission of instructor.

BUSN-114. Principles of Management. 3 Hours. An analysis of the techniques of management, this course covers the basic management principles of planning, organizing, staffing and controlling.

BUSN-116. Fundamentals of Business. 3 Hours. This is a survey of the organization, principles and practices of the business world. This course is designed to provide a general view of the field as a whole and to serve as a foundation for specialized business courses.

BUSN-119. Personal Finance. 3 Hours. This course is designed for the non-accounting major. It takes a consumer's view of daily financial issues. It includes preparing personal financial statements, managing credit, and describing the importance of investing to build wealth.

BUSN-133. Business Math. 3 Hours. This course is designed for all business students. The course will assist students in reaching a level of increased competence in mathematics and expanded understanding of the applications of mathematical concepts in business activities. Emphasis is placed upon learning mathematical concepts through practical application to common business problems.

BUSN-137. Small Business Management. 3 Hours. This course develops basic skills necessary to operate a small business within the highly competitive society of today's business world. Emphasis is placed on the responsibilities and procedures encountered in operating a small business. Specific areas covered will be: classifications, types, location, financing, market information, sales promotion, merchandising, controls, credit, buying, pricing and personnel selection and policies.

BUSN-154. Computerized Accounting. 3 Hours. This course is designed to teach how the computer can be used as an accounting tool. It is not intended to teach any new accounting concepts, but rather how accounting procedures can be applied through computer applications with the use of a general ledger  software package. Also included are modules for accounts receivable and payable, payroll and asset management. Prerequisite: Financial Accounting or permission of instructor.

BUSN-163. Introduction to Sports Marketing. 3 Hours. This course provides the fundamental skills and techniques needed to successfully plan and implement sports publicity and marketing.

BUSN-171. Financial Accounting. 3 Hours. This course is an introduction to basic accounting concepts and includes the collecting, recording and reporting of data. This course will also introduce corporations. This course is for students with little or no prior knowledge of accounting and will benefit career development of
students from all disciplines.

BUSN-175. Introduction to Leadership. 3 Hours. An analysis of the theories of leadership, this course covers the basic leadership principles of vision, goal setting, decision making, time management, empowering, delegating, initiating change, ethics and the leader's role in the community.

BUSN-201. Psychology of Business. 3 Hours. This is a study of business situations involving people and techniques and how to solve problems and conflict. This course will provide the fundamental human relations skills necessary for business management.

BUSN-202. Marketing. 3 Hours. This course is an integrated and analytical approach to the study of the marketing function. It includes the means and methods of marketing policies, flow of goods, government influence and trends in the marketplace. Emphasis will be placed on the 4 P's of marketing - product, price, place and promotion.

BUSN-220. Business Communications. 3 Hours. This course covers how to communicate in writing as well as orally and nonverbally. The fundamentals of how to write the different types of business letters, memos, reports, e-mail and web writing will be covered.

BUSN-221. Managerial Accounting. 3 Hours. This course uses accounting information in the financial decision-making process. It is for the student who already has some background on how financial information is collected and reported. This course is designed to teach students how to use financial information as a management tool. Prerequisite: Financial Accounting or consent of instructor.

BUSN-230. Intermediate Accounting I. 3 Hours. This course is for students who have taken Financial Accounting. It teaches students to take these financial concepts and apply them to reporting and investment decisions. Prerequisite: Financial Accounting.

BUSN-250. Human Resource Management. 3 Hours. This course provides an overview of the Human Resource Management field. Major topics include human resource planning, job analysis, recruitment, staffing, training, compensation and benefits, labor relations, diversity and ethics.

BUSN-260. Business Law I. 3 Hours. This course provides an introduction to basic principles of law and the American legal system with emphasis on business applications. Topics covered will include contracts, bailments and negotiable instruments.

BUSN-265. Business Law II. 3 Hours. This course is a continuation of material covered in Business Law I. It will provide students with basic business law principles that can be applied in daily business transactions. Topics covered will include agency and employment law, structure of business organizations, commercial paper, credit transactions and government regulations pertaining to business transactions. Prerequisite: Business Law I.

BUSN-270. Intermediate Accounting II. 3 Hours. This course is for students who have taken Financial Accounting and Intermediate Accounting I. It teaches students to take these financial concepts and apply  them to reporting and investment decisions. Prerequisite: Intermediate Accounting I.

CHEM-101. Fundamentals of Chemistry. 5 Hours. This course is designed for non-majors in science, such as agriculture, nursing, and home economics, who need one semester of college chemistry. It will give students an opportunity to master the fundamental principles of chemistry, and basic techniques in the laboratory. The course includes three credit hours of lecture and two credit hours of lab. Prerequisite: One year of high school algebra, or one semester of algebra at the college level.

CHEM-103. Principles of Chemistry I. 5 Hours. This course is designed for science majors, engineers, medically related majors, pharmacy majors, etc. Topics include measurement, atomic theory, periodic properties, formulas, equations, bonding, molecular geometry, solution stoichiometry, gases, solids and liquids. The course includes three credit hours of lecture and two credit hours of lab. Prerequisite: Intermediate Algebra or equivalent.

CHEM-104. Principles of Chemistry II and Qualitative Analysis. 5 Hours. This course is a continuation of Principles of Chemistry I. Topics include oxidation-reduction, acid-bases, kinetics, equilibrium, ionization, solubility product, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, organic and nuclear reactions. The course includes three credit hours of lecture and two credit hours of lab. Prerequisite: Principles of Chemistry I.

CHEM-201. Organic Chemistry. 5 Hours. This course is designed for students who need any course in organic chemistry. The topics include hydrocarbons, alcohols, ethers, aldehydes, ketones, acids, amides, amines, stereoisomers, carbohydrates and amino acids. The course includes three credit hours of lecture and two credit hours of lab. Prerequisite: Principles of Chemistry I.

CHEM-202. Quantitative Analysis. 5 Hours. Topics include analysis by volumetric, gravimetric, potentiometric and photometric means. The course includes three credit hours of lecture and two credit hours of lab. Prerequisite: Principles of Chemistry II and Qualitative Analysis.

COMM-101. Introduction to Mass Communications. 3 Hours. This is a three credit hour course focusing on the history and development of print and electronic media, including newspapers, magazines, radio and television. The class will consist of lecture from the required text and videotape presentations dealing with the various forms of mass communications.

COMM-121. Video Principles for Multi-Media. 3 Hours. This is a basic course dealing with the disciplines and techniques of video production. The course will cover audio, lighting, cameras and lenses, the switcher, recording and editing, single-camera talent, directing, and other crew positions.

COMM-225. Digital Photography. 3 Hours. This course has been created for the photographer who would like to use a computer as a darkroom. By providing a comprehensive introduction to electronic imaging, the course allows beginners and novices to develop the skills and creativity needed to be successful in the field.

COMM-230. Digital Editing. 3 Hours. This course is designed to further train students interested in video production, web design or other multi-media applications. The course will focus on techniques for nonlinear digital editing or editing of video and audio using the computer and appropriate software. There will be comparison made between digital editing and traditional analog editing. In addition, the course will cover areas such as shooting video and audio and applying graphics used in the editing process. The course will be taught on PC and MacIntosh platforms. Prerequisite: Video Principles for Multi-Media.

COMM-235. Streaming Media for the Web. 3 Hours. This is a course dealing with specific audio and video applications for use on the World Wide Web. The course will cover technical specifications for placement of media on the World Wide Web and how it differs from video and audio used in an analog environment such as broadcast television. The student will learn to combine video, audio and still images to create streaming media.

COMM-262. TV Internship - News. 2 Hours. This course is designed to further train the Communications and Broadcasting Technology student. The student must have already taken Video Principles for Multi-Media. The course will deal primarily with advanced techniques in broadcast news. The student, by working a regular shift at a TV station, will attain valuable "hands-on" experience. The course will present ideas and practical knowledge as well as provide the how and whys of special electronic potentials of video equipment. In this course the student will assume the position of a news reporter at a local television station. There is also considerable time spent on sharpening editing and other production skills. The student should gain a fresh perspective on video's conventional working methods that will help to attain greater control and personal expression using today's technology. While the student is at the television station, he/she will be under direct supervision of the news director. Prerequisite: Video Principles for Multi-Media, Video Production Applications and Introduction to Mass Communications.

COMM-263. TV Internship - Production. 2 Hours. This course is designed to further train the Communications and Broadcasting Technology student. The student must have already taken Video  Principles for Multi-Media, Video Production Applications and Introduction to Mass Communications. The course will deal primarily with advanced techniques in commercial TV production. The student, by working a regular shift at a TV station, will attain valuable "hands-on" experience. The course will present ideas and practical knowledge as well as provide the how and whys of special electronic potentials of video equipment. In this course the student will assume a position in the commercial production department at a local television station. There is also considerable time spent on sharpening editing and other production skills. The student should gain a fresh perspective on video's conventional working methods that will help to attain greater control and personal expression using today's technology. While the student is at the television station, he/she will be under direct supervision of the production manager. Prerequisite: Video Principles for Multi- Media, Video Production Applications and Introduction to Mass Communications.

COMM-270. TV Production Practice II. 3 Hours. Students in this class should have already taken TV Production Practice I. This course requires self-motivation. The class will be responsible for producing one or more programs for airing on the College cable channel. These programs will run on a regular basis, therefore the production crew must be dedicated and take their work seriously. There will be some outside reports that will have to be completed. Production quality is a major concern that contributes to the overall look of the station. This is also very true in an actual broadcast station. The whole value of the learning experience of this course is to simulate a working situation and obtain the hands-on experience. Prerequisite: TV Production Practice I.

COMP-161. Computer Information Systems. 3 Hours. This is a theory course designed to introduce students to the history, terminology and applications of computers. The student will learn the fundamentals of Windows along with many of the application software programs including spreadsheets, word processing, databases and presentation software. The fundamentals of computer programming will also be studied as well as the different programming languages currently being used in industry.

COMP-162. Computer Concepts and Applications. 3 Hours. This course provides an introduction to computer concepts and terminology, information technology, and software applications used in business and industry. Included are word processing, spreadsheets, databases, and presentation management.

COMP-190. Microcomputer Applications I. 1-3 Hours. Students receive hands-on experience with microcomputers while learning introductory theories and practical applications of a software program. Software programs may include Windows, Word, Excel, Access, FrontPage, Internet and Web Design.

COMP-191. Adobe PageMaker. 3 Hours. The Adobe PageMaker program is a program widely accepted
among designers, graphic designers, writers, editors and typesetters as a tool to integrate text and graphics from many sources into virtually any kind of publication, from newsletters and brochures to color catalogs and magazines, with maximum precision and control. In this course the student will be expected to learn and explore the creative and practical possibilities of the program. The student will learn the basic functions and applications of the Adobe PageMaker program.

COMP-195. Principles of Web Page Design. 3 Hours. This course is intended for those with some computer experience and includes practical hands-on project work. In this course, students learn the principles of the World Wide Web, learn to identify common problems in Web design, plan a web site project and have a practical understanding of how to build, update and publish a web site using a visual editor and HTML. The course is hands-on and production-driven where students learn about web design and authoring through lectures, discussions, demonstrations and through developing actual web pages.

COMP-203. Introduction to Computer Programming: Visual BASIC for WINDOWS. 3 Hours. Visual BASIC is a sophomore level course designed to introduce students to the concept of Object Oriented Event@ program design and coding. Utilizing Window controls and features will be an integral part of these exercises. This course carries a credit of three hours. Prerequisite: Knowledge of an introductory level programming such as BASIC, FORTRAN or C.

COMP-205. Web Design Technologies. 3 Hours. This introductory course introduces the fundamentals of popular Web page design tools and technologies. No prior knowledge of HTML/XHTML or any other languages or tools is required. Students will be introduced to the basics of HTML/XHTML and Cascading Style Sheets. They will also learn basic Web design using the authoring tool Macromedia Dreamweaver. Images and animations will be created by using Adobe PhotoShop, Adobe ImageReady, Macromedia Fireworks and Macromedia Flash. The JavaScript scripting language and Dynamic Hypertext Markup Language (DHTML) may also be examined if time permits.

COMP-212. Computer Programming: C++. 3 Hours. This course is designed to introduce students to the concepts of programming in a machine independent language. One will learn the fundamentals to structured programming and object-oriented programming in the language C++. Prerequisite: Introduction to Computer Programming: BASIC or previous knowledge of programming.

COMP-214. Computer Programming: Visual C++. 3 Hours. This course is designed to introduce students to the concepts of programming in a machine independent language. One will learn the fundamentals to structured programming and object-oriented programming in the language Visual C++. Prerequisite: Introduction to Computer Programming: BASIC or previous knowledge of programming.

COMP-221. Computer Programming: Java. 3 Hours. This course is designed to introduce students to the concepts of programming in a machine independent language. One will learn the fundamentals to structured programming and object-oriented programming as well as writing applets for Web pages in the language JAVA. Prerequisite: Introduction to Computer Programming: BASIC or experience with another high-level language.

COMP-226. Computer Programming: JavaScript. 3 Hours. This course is designed to introduce students to the concepts of writing computer programs and Web pages using JavaScript. The student will learn all of the tools used in JavaScript and then will integrate them to build a Web page. Some of the tools that will be covered include expressions, decision statements, loops, arrays, functions, strings, events and objects. Prerequisite: Introduction to Computer Programming: BASIC or previous knowledge of programming.

COMP-245. Interactive Authoring: Adobe Director. 3 Hours. This course is an introduction to creating multimedia applications using Macromedia Director MX. Students will learn how to plan and create movies from scratch, import and manage media from other sources, add navigation and user interaction, and prepare and deliver movies for distribution on CD-ROM or the Web.

COMP-256. Web Graphics. 3 Hours. The main purpose of this course is to instruct students in basic and intermediate graphics design skills primarily for a Web environment and to prepare students for future careers as Web Designers. The basics of graphics design are included, from logos to icons to sliced images. This course affords a wealth of opportunity for hands-on experience using the primary design tools used in industry today.

COMP-276. Presenting With Multimedia. 3 Hours. Multimedia introduces students to the creation and use of business presentations using multimedia software. Multimedia covers evaluation of media for various target audiences, advantages and disadvantages of various presentation methods/media, principles of design and creation of presentations.

COMP-277. Desktop Publishing: Adobe InDesign. 3 Hours. This course will expose students to InDesign, a comprehensive software program that allows students to create output-ready layouts for anything from a simple coupon to an 8-page newsletter to a 120-page full-color magazine. This program interfaces seamlessly with Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator.

COMP-282. Internet Navigation and Exploration. 3 Hours. This course introduces students to the primary tools of the Internet. Hands-on exercises teach students how to access information from a multitude of different areas.

COMP-283. Web Page Design with Microsoft FrontPage. 3 Hours. This course introduces students to the popular Web design program Microsoft FrontPage. Students will be introduced to the World Wide Web and will develop skills in construction of web pages and web sites through tutorials and cases related to business applications. Students will create, publish, test and maintain Web pages using the visual editor.

COMP-284. Web Page Design with HTML. 3 Hours. This course introduces the student to the language of Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) for creating properly formatted pages for the World Wide Web. Students will create, publish, test and maintain Web pages using HTML.

COMP-285. Image Manipulation: Adobe Photoshop. 3 Hours. This course will expose students to a comprehensive understanding of Adobe Photoshop. Students will develop creative projects through concise instructions, and complete coverage of basic to advanced Photoshop skills to help students create dynamic Photoshop art.

COMP-286. Illustration: Adobe Illustrator. 3 Hours. This course will expose students to creative projects, concise instructions, and complete coverage of basic to advanced Illustrator skills, helping students create polished, professional-looking illustrations. Students will create everything from simple graphics, icons and text to complex and multilayered illustrations, all of which can be used within a page layout, in a multimedia
presentation, or on the Web

COMP-289. Web Production I. 3 Hours. In this course students will learn how to develop Web sites utilizing the skills they have acquired from previously required Web Design course work. The course will teach students how to manage the Web site development process. In this course students will explore all aspects of Web Production from page design through user testing to uploading and maintenance.

COMP-290. Microcomputer Applications II. 1-3 Hours. Students receive hands-on experience with microcomputers while learning advanced theories and practical applications of a software program. Software programs may include Windows, Word, Excel, Access, FrontPage, Internet and Web Design.

COMP-291. Digital Media: Adobe Premiere. 3 Hours. This course will teach students how to create digital movies using Adobe Premiere software. Students will learn how to capture and edit digital video and will learn creative ways to include digital videos in DVDs, web sites and other multimedia projects. They will also learn how to: assemble and edit a video sequence; enhance video with transitions, effect and titles; work with audio, capture video, and export a video.

COMP-296. Web Animation with Macromedia Flash. 3 Hours. This course is designed to teach students how to use Macromedia Flash to create dynamic, compelling and highly interactive Web content. Students will use Macromedia Flash as a drawing tool, an animation environment, a programming language and a web authoring package.

COMP-297. Web Page Design with Macromedia Dreamweaver. 3 Hours. The main purpose of this course is to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of Macromedia Dreamweaver, and the knowledge, skills and abilities necessary to create Web sites.

ECON-205. Principles of Macroeconomics. 3 Hours. This course is a study of macroeconomic analysis. Topics include contemporary issues such as inflation, unemployment, economic growth and how public policy deals with them.

ECON-206. Principles of Microeconomics. 3 Hours. This course is a study of microeconomic analysis. Topics include consumer and firm behavior, competitive pricing, monopoly power and international trade.

EDUC-195.  Introduction to Education.  3 Hours.  This course will provide a survey of the historical, philosophical and cultural foundations of education and an overview of the process of the establishment of educational policy.  Common effective teaching methodologies will be examined.  The course serves as an introduction to teacher preparation programs at universities and is required for program admissions.

EDUC-220.  Pre-Professional Teaching Laboratory.  1 Hour.  This course will provide laboratory experience to those preparing to teach through observing, working with individual students or small groups and sometimes working as a teacher's aid in school settings. Prerequisite:  Developmental Psychology.

ENGL-101. English Composition I. 3 Hours. This course provides review of language mechanics through writing assignments with emphasis on expository and argumentative forms. Prerequisite: A minimum score of 55 on the Writing section of the COMPASS, or fully complete Written Communications with a grade of C or above.

ENGL-102. English Composition II. 3 Hours. This course provides practice in needed mechanics and expository writing with emphasis on literary analysis and the research paper. Prerequisite: English Composition I with grade of C or above.

ENGL-105. English Improvement for Foreign Students. 3 Hours. This course is designed to meet the needs of students who come from countries with a native language other than English. The course content includes grammar, structure, usage, vocabulary development, listening comprehension, dictation and reading comprehension. The student is also given the opportunity to improve in conversational English by practice in oral drills, dialogues and group conversation.

ENGL-190. Introduction to Literature. 3 Hours. This course is a study of short fiction and poetry with a thematic emphasis. The course covers various themes universal to all cultures. The selections used are multi-cultural and expand on issues present in society. Such themes are parent/child relationships, innocence/ experience, search for power, search for the American dream, failures and successes, violence, security, isolation, fantasy vs. reality, love, and men and women conflicts. Through the broad scope of selections, students will gain a deeper understanding and appreciation for literature. Prerequisite: English
Composition I.

ENGL-200. Native American Literature. 3 Hours. Students in this course will explore the literary traditions of American Indians by studying stories, songs, orations, poems, plays and films that reflect the lived experiences of indigenous cultures. To emphasize the role of experience, students will have an opportunity to hear guest speakers - storytellers and singers, writers and poets, actors and playwrights - comment upon their art. Students will also engage in a variety of classroom activities (often supplemented by various audio/visual resources and multimedia technologies) designed to cultivate an intimacy with the themes of
Native American literature. Moreover, each student will record his or her experience with the course  materials in a creative journal, a project that will be limited only by the imaginative faculties of the individual student. While the creative journal will be the primary means of evaluating student understanding, a number of topical exams also will be administered. Prerequisite: English Composition I or permission of instructor.

ENGL-202. Creative Writing. 3 Hours. This course is designed to facilitate the student's creative faculties and abilities. The course will serve as an introduction to the writing of original poetry, short fiction and drama. Instruction in literary techniques will direct the student's writing. In addition to working within literary conventions to produce manuscripts, students will be exposed to exemplary texts by selected authors.  Students will learn to critique their own work and the work of others by participating in writing workshops. Students will be introduced to markets for creative writing and will be encouraged to submit some work for publication. Prerequisite: English Composition II or permission of instructor.

ENGL-203. Major English Writers. 3 Hours. This course will trace the development of style from its Old English origin to the twentieth century. Through class discussion, journal writing, oral presentations, papers and tests, students will examine literary periods and individual pieces of literature. The course is designed to provide an overview of English literature and promote an understanding of literature of the past and its connection with the society of today. Prerequisite: English Composition I.

ENGL-204. American Literature. 3 Hours. This is a course of critical reading and evaluation of selected major American writings from the 17th century to present. Examples of the major genres will be studied, including oral literatures, poetry, drama, the essay, the short story and the novel. The course emphasis is upon central figures and representative selections from major works in selected literary traditions.  Prerequisite: English Composition I.

ENGL-205. Old Testament Literature. 3 Hours. Students will be guided in a study of the Old Testament from a literary viewpoint. Students will learn a set of principles for interpreting the Old Testament as a piece of literature, and they will analyze specific passages, using these literary principles. The students will become familiar with the eight literary genres in the Old Testament, and they will analyze each. Students will also examine the literary unity of the Old Testament. This course is not a study of religious doctrine or theology. Prerequisite: English Composition I.

ENGL-206. New Testament Literature. 3 Hours. This course includes an evaluative study of the books of the New Testament in the light of their literary and cultural contributions. Prerequisite: English Composition I.

ENGL-207. Children's Literature. 3 Hours. This is a how-to course to teach a child to want to read. The course is an introduction to books that are a joy to read, that have been written especially for children and that meet high literary and artistic standards. The focus is to teach elementary education majors how to teach their future students to want to read. Prerequisite: English Composition I.

ENGL-209. Poetry and Drama. 3 Hours. This course is an introduction to various types of poetry and drama of literature, early as well as contemporary. A basic approach how to analyze poetry and drama and  express appreciation and interpretations of the broad scope of the literary are both past and present. Prerequisite: English Composition I.

ENGL-210. Fiction and Prose. 3 Hours. This course is a literature course designed to stimulate an understanding of the short story and the novel by means of critical and introspective reading. The student's reading will be enriched by class discussions, lectures, oral reports, an understanding of fictional elements and an overview of consummate writers who have mastered their craft. Prerequisite: English Composition I.

ENGL-214. Classic Theatre: The Humanities in Drama. 3 Hours. This course is a study of drama and literature by European authors of the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries to be developed around a selection of 13 televised plays, augmented by textual materials and readings.

ENGL-220. African American Literature. 3 Hours. This course will explore the distinct literary traditions of African Americans, kept alive beyond slavery through song, sermon, and other spoken and written forms. Through an aesthetic approach the student will experience the centuries long emergence of the traditions in poetry, fiction, drama, essays, speeches, letters, autobiographies, sermons, criticism, journals, and folk literature from secular songs to rap. Students will engage in a variety of classroom activities (often supplemented by various audio/visual resources and multi-media technologies) designed to cultivate an
intimacy with the themes of African American literature. Moreover, each student will record his or her  experience with the course materials in a creative journal, a project that will be limited only by the  imaginative faculties of the individual student. While the creative journal will be the primary means of evaluating student understanding, a number of topical exams will also be administered. Prerequisite: English Composition I or permission of instructor.

ENGL-290. Technical Writing. 3 Hours. This course offers practice in writing short reports, formal reports  and basic business correspondence with emphasis on purpose, audience analysis, organization, style and format. Prerequisite: English Composition II.

ENGL-291. Technical Writing for Business and Industry. 3 Hours. This course offers practice in writing short reports, formal reports and basic business correspondence with emphasis on purpose, audience analysis, organization, style and format. Prerequisite: English Composition II or permission of instructor.

ENGL-297. Contemporary American Film. 3 Hours. This course analyzes modern American films with particular attention to storytelling techniques, cinematic rendering and thematic meaning. Films will be examined against the backdrop of their specific historical-socio-political context. Prerequisite: English Composition I with a grade of C or above.

ENGR-210. Engineering Physics I. 5 Hours. This is a theory and lab course which covers vectors, mechanics, wave motion, simple harmonic motion and the Laws of Thermodynamics including Kinetic Theory. Calculus is used in the problem solving. The course includes four credit hours of lecture and one credit hour of lab. Prerequisite: Calculus with Analytic Geometry I or concurrently enrolled in Calculus with Analytic Geometry I.

ENGR-211. Engineering Physics II. 5 Hours. This course is a theory and lab course which continues with heat, thermodynamics, optics, electricity and magnetism, and elements of modern physics. Calculus is used in the problem solving. The course includes four credit hours of lecture and one credit hour of lab. Prerequisite: Engineering Physics I.

FACS-107. Marriage and the Family. 3 Hours. This course is a study of all kinds of relationships within the marriage and family experience, including premarital relationships. The differences among families and marriages, family structures and functions, changes throughout the family life cycle, and the history of marriage and family in American culture will be examined.

FACS-117. Early Childhood Development. 3 Hours. This course is designed to be an in-depth study of the child beginning with prenatal development and extending through infancy, the pre-school years, and extending through middle childhood and adolescence. Laboratory observations of children at various stages of physical growth and emotional development are included in the course of study.

FACS-120. Consumer Education. 3 Hours. The course is designed to assist consumers to buy products and services efficiently (1) by using resources available to them, (2) by increasing their problem-solving and decision-making skills, and (3) by offering very practical help in buying food, clothing, transportation,  furniture, housing, insurance and credit. Budgeting, consumer fraud and cost-comparison projects are a part of the course.

FACS-210. Nutrition. 3 Hours. This course emphasizes the basic principles of normal nutrition in relation to individual and family health throughout the life cycle. Socio-psychological aspects as well as physiological aspects of nutrition are included. The six major nutrients will be investigated for their function in the body and sources in the diet. Participation in projects is required.

FLNG-103. Spanish I. 5 Hours. This course includes the study of the structure of the language, elementary conversation, reading and writing.

FLNG-104. Spanish II. 5 Hours. This course is a continuation of Spanish I: the study of the structure of the language, elementary conversation, reading and writing. The class is designed to include cultural awareness and reading short stories written by major Hispanic writers. Prerequisite: Spanish I or instructor's permission.

FLNG-203. Spanish III. 3 Hours. This course includes the reading of modern short stories, poetry and drama. This is an intermediate Spanish course which integrates language and culture by reviewing grammatical points with high interest topics. The class is designed to develop language skills and cultural awareness through the active use of art, music and literature from the Spanish-speaking world. Prerequisite: Spanish II or its equivalent.

FLNG-204. Spanish IV. 3 Hours. This course includes the review of the structure of the language, composition, and conversation. Prerequisite: Spanish III or its equivalent.

GEOG-120. World Geography. 3 Hours. This survey course includes climatology, oceanography,  morphology, earthquakes and volcanism from physical geography; and military, political, urban, cultural and economic fields from social geography. The course is structured to allow students to pursue the fields which are most relevant to their major field of study.

GOVN-104. United States Government. 3 Hours. This course is a survey of U. S. national government with emphasis on the Constitution, the Congress, the President and the Supreme Court. Foreign Policy since 1938 is also emphasized.

HIST-102. Early United States History. 3 Hours. A study of the origins of the American nation to the surrender at Appomattox. Special emphasis is placed on the political, economic and social development of the American nation.

HIST-103. Recent United States History. 3 Hours. The emergence of modern America from 1865 to the present presented in chronological sequence with emphasis on those political, social and economic events that shaped our modern history.

HORT-141. Community Gardening. 3 Hours. This course is designed to help students with the home culture of vegetables, herbs, small fruits, bedding plants, and fruit and nut trees. Choosing types of plants, edible landscaping, selecting and preparing a site, fertilizing and controlling pests, training and pruning, harvesting and preserving are featured. Students will start seeds in the greenhouse, transplant and care for a food garden.

HORT-146. Landscape Plants. 1 Hour. This course studies the identification, culture and landscape use of a variety of plants adapted to this climate. A survey of important evergreen and deciduous trees and shrubs, groundcovers, ornamental grasses and herbaceous perennial and annual flowers will be conducted. Campus walks and slides will be used to study many of the plants. Two-thirds hour lecture and two-thirds hour lab per credit hour.

HORT-203. Horticultural Science. 4 Hours. Horticultural plant structure and function, effects of environmental factors on plant growth and survey of the fruit, nut, vegetable, bedding plant, pot plant, cut flower, nursery and landscape industries will be studied. Horticultural crop families, growing systems and culture needs, soil preparation and fertilization, selecting and propagating varieties, preventing pests, regulating growth, harvesting, value-added processing and marketing will be included. The course includes three credit hours of lecture and one credit hour of lab.

HORT-221. Herbaceous Ornamental Plants. 2 Hours. Students will learn the identification, cultural requirements and landscape value of ornamental flowering herbaceous plants. This course provides garden design principles and various styles of gardens, and design and installation of herbaceous beds and borders. Two hours lecture/studio/practicum per week.

HORT-248. Landscape Design. 3 Hours. In this course students will learn to create pleasing planting designs for residential, business and public properties. Site analysis and modifications, determining clients' needs, design principles, choosing plant materials, maintenance considerations, installation and care of plantings will be covered. Students will create designs for a campus area, a home, a business and will participate in installing their campus design. Offered for one credit and for three credits.

HORT-252. Plant Propagation. 3 Hours. Students will learn the principles and techniques of reproducing plant varieties by seed, leaf and root cuttings, bulbs, corms, tubers and rhizomes; layering, divisions, grafting and budding, and tissue culture. Basic fundamentals of seed structure and vegetative makeup of plants are emphasized. Students will propagate plants in the greenhouse, then grow them in the greenhouse or nursery until sale or landscape installation size. Offered for three credits and for one credit. Prerequisite: Horticultural Science.

HORT-284. Landscape Development Practicum. 3 Hours. This course provides a learn-by-doing approach to landscape installation, development and management. Students will evaluate campus landscape conditions and needs, and will suggest and implement improvements. They will install new plantings, edgings and mulch, stake and prune plants and fertilize and apply irrigation and herbicides.

HPER-101. First Aid. 2 Hours. This course is designed to acquaint the student with procedures necessary when assisting victims of accidents or sudden illness needing emergency treatment. Meets the requirements for American Red Cross certificates: Standard First Aid and CPR.

HPER-102. Personal Hygiene and Community Health. 3 Hours. This course discusses the physical and mental aspects of healthy living and the application of the principles of health to the individual, school and community. Helps students view health as a quality of life and explores a variety of health alternatives.

HPER-103. Introduction to Health, Physical Education and Recreation. 3 Hours. This course is designed to provide prospective health and physical educators with an insight into health, physical education and sports so they may obtain a basic understanding of the profession. It discusses philosophy, history, concepts and the significance to total education.

HPER-105. Rules and Officiating of Sports. 2 Hours. This course is designed to provide information to students in the areas of contest rules and official's responsibilities in the following five major sports: basketball, football, baseball, softball and volleyball. Each sport will represent a unit in which the students will display an understanding and appreciation of general rules and official responsibilities by performing well on quizzes/tests, daily assignments and presentations.

HPER-106. Weight Training and Body Conditioning. 2 Hours. This course is designed to introduce and develop strength and endurance through various methods of weight training and conditioning techniques. Different principles of total fitness development will be discussed. May be taken for credit four times to apply toward graduation.

HPER-111. Lifetime Fitness Concepts. 2 Hours. This course is designed to inform and motivate students to learn techniques which will improve fitness, promote personal wellness and develop a positive lifestyle behavior. Health related components of physical fitness will be presented through lectures, demonstrations and personal assessment. Students will be expected to apply these concepts through implementation of their own personal exercise and weight control programs.

HPER-112. Physical Fitness. 2 Hours. This course is designed to introduce and develop fitness and conditioning through various methods of cardiorespiratory and muscular training techniques. Different principles of total fitness development will be discussed. May be taken for credit four times to apply toward graduation.

HPER-112. Physical Fitness - Cheerleading. 2 Hours. This course is designed to develop fundamental skills in the various techniques associated with cheerleading which includes stunts and tumbling. Members of the team are selected annually. Their responsibilities include regular practice, various competitions and performances at most intercollegiate athletic football and basketball games.

HPER-112. Physical Fitness - Dance. 2 Hours. This course is designed to develop specialized skills in a minimum of five different styles of dance including pom, lyrical, jazz, hip-hop and modern. Members of the team are selected annually. Their responsibilities include regular practice, various competitions as budgets allow and performances at most home intercollegiate athletic football and basketball games.

HPER-113. Physical Fitness II. 2 Hours. This course is designed to introduce and develop fitness and conditioning through various methods of cardiorespiratory and muscular training techniques. Different principles of total fitness development will be discussed. May be taken for credit four times to apply toward graduation.

HPER-114. Weight Training and Body Conditioning II. 2 Hours. This course is designed to introduce and develop strength and endurance through various methods of weight training and conditioning techniques. Different principles of total fitness development will be discussed. May be taken for credit four times to apply toward graduation.

HPER-115. Instruction and Analysis of Individual and Dual Sports. 3 Hours. This course is designed to introduce history, theories, safety precautions, teaching progressions and skill development so the student can understand and acquire competency in individual and dual sports. Sports activities to be selected from the following: badminton, table tennis, golf, racquetball, tennis and fitness activities.

HPER-119. Football. 1 Hour. This course is designed to develop fundamental skills using selected drills and participation. Fall semester only. May be taken for credit two times. Prerequisite: Approval by the Head Football Coach.

HPER-120. Basketball. 1 Hour. This is a service course designed to meet the interests of students who desire to participate and develop skills in the team sport of basketball. May be taken for credit two times. Prerequisite: Instructor approval.

HPER-121. Golf. 1 Hour. This course is designed to help a student develop skills unique to golf. Opportunities will be presented to enable a student to build skills and develop techniques which are specific to the game through drills, teaching progressions and activities. May be taken for credit two times.

HPER-123. Track. 1 Hour. This course is designed to develop fundamental skills using selected drills and participation. Spring semester only. May be taken for credit two times. Prerequisite: Instructor approval.

HPER-124. Baseball. 1 Hour. This course is designed to help a student develop skills unique to baseball. Opportunities will be presented to enable a student to build skills and develop techniques which are specific to the game through drills, teaching progressions and activities. May be taken for credit two times.

HPER-125. Volleyball. 1 Hour. This course is designed to help a student develop fundamental skills unique to power volleyball. Opportunities will be presented that enable a student to play and have fun while building skills and developing techniques which are specific to the game through drills, teaching progressions and activities. May be taken for credit two times.

HPER-127. Softball. 1 Hour. This course is designed to develop fundamental skills using selected drills and participation. Spring and Fall semesters only. May be taken for credit two times.

HPER-130. Instruction and Analysis of Team Sports. 3 Hours. This course is designed to introduce history, theories, safety precautions, teaching progressions and skill development so the student can understand the acquisition of competencies in team sports. Sport activities to be selected from the following: basketball, field hockey, flag football, soccer, softball, team handball and volleyball.

HPER-131. Basketball II. 1 Hour. This is a service course designed to meet the interests of students who desire to participate and develop skills in the team sport of basketball. May be taken for credit two times. Prerequisite: Instructor approval.

HPER-132. Golf II. 1 Hour. This course is designed to help a student develop skills unique to golf. Opportunities will be presented to enable a student to build skills and develop techniques which are specific to the game through drills, teaching progressions and activities. May be taken for credit two times.

HPER-133. Baseball II. 1 Hour. This course is designed to help a student develop skills unique to baseball. Opportunities will be presented to enable a student to build skills and develop techniques which are specific to the game through drills, teaching progressions and activities. May be taken for credit two times.

HPER-134. Track II. 1 Hour. This course is designed to develop fundamental skills using selected drills and participation. Spring semester only. May be taken for credit two times.

HPER-136. Softball II. 1 Hour. This course is designed to develop fundamental skills using selected drills and participation. Spring and Fall semesters only. May be taken for credit two times.

HPER-140. Individual Activity. 1 Hour. This is a service course designed to meet the interests of students who desire to participate and develop skills in individual lifetime sports and activities: archery, bowling, fly casting, fly tying, golf, knitting, tennis, pocket billiards, swimming, dance, tumbling, walking, weight training, jogging. Specific courses emphasizing only one sport or activity will be offered each semester.

HPER-150. Team Activity. 1 Hour. These are service courses designed to meet the interests of students who desire to participate and develop skills in team sports and activities: baseball, basketball, football, soccer, softball, volleyball. Specific courses emphasizing only one sport or activity will be offered each semester.

HPER-150. Team Activity: Soccer. 1 Hour. This is a service course designed to meet the interests of students who desire to participate and develop skills in the team sport of soccer.

HPER-165. Introduction to Athletic Training. 3 Hours. This course is designed to introduce the profession of Athletic Training and its application in athletics, industry, recreation, and to physically active people. It will address the fundamental principles of athletic and active injuries and their management, along with other paramedical-related topics. It will also include some taping and wrapping techniques.

HPER-172. Wellness. 1 Hour. This course is designed to acquaint the student with the various aspects of a healthy lifestyle, to understand behavior modification techniques and incorporate them into healthy lifestyle options. It discusses diet, stress and fitness principles necessary for healthy living.

HPER-190. Introduction to Weight Training. 3 Hours. This is a "Teach the Teacher" course in beginning weight training. The emphasis is on teaching the what, why, and how of weight training and program development for beginners.

HPER-201. Recreational Activities. 3 Hours. This course is designed to acquaint the student with the basic rules and fundamentals of several recreational activities. The course will include a brief consideration of a wide variety of lifetime activities including billiards, bowling, swimming and table tennis.

HPER-203. Theory and Techniques of Football. 2 Hours. This course is designed to introduce the student to the fundamentals, techniques, various teaching and coaching theories and skill progressions involved in football. Individual and offensive and defensive team strategies will be discussed through lectures, demonstrations, videos and reports.

HPER-206. Theory and Techniques of Track and Field. 2 Hours. This course is designed to introduce the student to the fundamentals, techniques, various teaching/coaching theories and skill progressions involved in the various events of track and field. Individual training strategies will be discussed through lectures, demonstrations, videos and reports.

HPER-209. Practicum in Athletic Training I. 2 Hours. This course is designed to acquaint the student to athletic training through the day-to-day operation of the athletic training room including outside computer assignments. Intended audience includes: athletic trainers, health/physical education majors, coaches, managers and sport/fitness people.

HPER-210. Practicum in Athletic Training II. 2 Hours. This course is designed to continue where Practicum I (HPER-209) discontinues with the day-today operation of the athletic training room including outside computer assignments. Intended audience includes: athletic trainers, health/physical education majors, coaches, managers and sport/fitness people. Prerequisite: Practicum in Athletic Training I.

HPER-212. Adventure Hiking. 3 Hours. This physically strenuous course is designed to give the student a better understanding of the fundamental knowledge needed to enjoy hiking and backpacking with fun and safety. Students will experience a lifelong activity that promotes a healthy and active lifestyle. Topics will include safety, first aid, ecology, clothing, food, walking technique, navigation, fitness training.

HPER-270. Basic Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries. 3 Hours. This course is designed to study the principles and practices in prevention, management and rehabilitation of common, minor athletic injuries. Prerequisite: Introduction to Athletic Training is required. Anatomy and Physiology, Practicum in Athletic Training I and First Aid are suggested.

HUMN-104. Introduction to Philosophy. 3 Hours. This course is a survey of the main problems in philosophy as presented in the writings of major philosophers. The course will present a study of the intellectual  problems of our times as well as draw upon the knowledge and inquiries of past contemporaries. Philosophical concepts and theories will be explored by using applications of present social trends, issues and problems.

HUMN-120. Issues in Philosophy. 3 Hours. This course will examine the philosophical positions underlying contemporary issues, and the relationship of those issues to our inherited and diverse intellectual tradition. The emphasis is placed on understanding relevant philosophical issues, enabling the students to formulate their own informed conclusions.

HUMN-125. Humanities I. 1 Hour. This course enables the student to study the disciplines that serve as outlets for human expression. Opportunities will be provided to gain insight into human communication efforts in art, drama, music, dance and literature. The student will become acquainted with these areas through lectures, demonstrations, exhibits, concerts and selfstudy. May be taken for credit three times.

HUMN-130. History and Development of Motion Pictures. 3 Hours. This course is designed to provide a critical survey of motion pictures as a distinctive form and as a medium of expression and communication, with attention given to silent films, early talking pictures and cinema innovators from the origins of the  motion picture medium.

HUMN-135. Humanities II. 2 Hours. This is a continuation of the study begun in Humanities I including a second series of lectures, demonstrations, exhibits and readings. Prerequisite: Humanities I.

HUMN-151. Comparative Humanities. 3 Hours. Comparative Humanities is designed to bring the humanities into focus in relation to the modern world through lectures, demonstrations, readings and field trips. The Humanities are the disciplines that provide people with resources for engaging in humanistic concerns and leading a satisfying existence. They include the arts, religion, philosophy, architecture, history and those aspects of social and physical sciences which affect the quality and conduct of human life. A primary goal of Comparative Humanities is to enhance student learning through on-site instruction. While certain classes should remain on campus, others may benefit from the opportunities provided by travel. Course may be repeated.

HUMN-153. Comparative Humanities: Honors. 3 Hours. This course is designed to bring the humanities into focus in relation to the modern world through lectures, demonstrations, readings and field trips. The Humanities are the disciplines that provide people with resources for engaging in humanistic concerns and leading a satisfying existence. They include the arts, religion, philosophy, architecture, history and those aspects of social and physical sciences which affect the quality and conduct of human life. A primary goal of Comparative Humanities is to enhance student learning through on-site instruction. Our primary focus will be the current Phi Theta Kappa Honors Study Topic. Prerequisite: Selection for the CCC Honors Program.

HUMN-156. Honors Seminar. 1 Hour. The purpose of the seminar is to focus on topics of an interdisciplinary nature to stimulate critical thinking. All seminar classes will have different content. Discussions, guest lecturers, along with extensive reading and writing will be the chosen methods of instruction. Prerequisite:
Selection for the CCC Honors Program.

HUMN-180. Introduction to Ethics. 3 Hours. This course is an introductory study of the nature of morality, moral judgments, moral knowledge and the relation of morality to religion. The course will take an integrated approach, combining the appeal and strengths of the moral problems approach with classical texts, thus providing a solid foundation in moral theory and moral reasoning.

HUMN-208. World Religions. 3 Hours. This course is a meaningful and thoughtful approach to the study of religions, relevant for humanities and cultural studies. The series explores modern religious practices and interpretations around the world: Buddhism, Judaism, Catholicism, Taoism, Zen, Islam and others. Prerequisite: English Composition I.

HUMN-218. Logic and Critical Thinking. 3 Hours. This course is a basic introduction to both deductive and inductive reasoning. Emphasis is placed on identifying, analyzing and constructing arguments. It examines the logical structure of English sentences, determining validity, examining premises, and using a symbolic system which models logical relations among sentences. Special emphasis will be placed upon the logical appraisal of everyday arguments and the analysis of value arguments.

HUMN-225. Humanities III. 3 Hours. Humanities is designed to enable the student to study the disciplines which pursue humanistic concerns, the relationship between the humanities, the arts and the sciences. Traditionally, these have included the fine arts, literature, drama, philosophy and religion, but the new humanist is greatly interested in anthropology, history, psychology and those aspects of the sciences and math which have direct bearing upon the qualities of human life. The student will become acquainted with these areas through lectures, demonstrations, exhibits and textual materials.

HUMN-235. Humanities IV. 3 Hours. Humanities is designed to enable the student to study the disciplines which pursue humanistic concerns, the relationship between the humanities, the arts and the sciences. Traditionally, these have included the fine arts, literature, drama, philosophy and religion, but the new humanist is greatly interested in anthropology, history, psychology and those aspects of the sciences and math which have direct bearing upon the qualities of human life. The student will become acquainted with these areas through lectures, demonstrations, exhibits and textual materials.

HUMN-253. Comparative Humanities II: Honors. 3 Hours. This course is designed to bring the humanities into focus in relation to the modern world through lectures and readings The primary focus will be the current Phi Theta Kappa Honors Study Topic. Readings, lectures and writings will be the focus of this in-depth Humanities class. Prerequisite: Selection for the CCC Honors Program and a passing grade in Comparative Humanities: Honors.

MATH-102. Intermediate Algebra*. 3 Hours. This course is designed to survey the basic topics in algebra which will enable the student to enter a course in college algebra. Prerequisite: A minimum score of 31 on the Algebra Test of the COMPASS or credit in Introductory Algebra with a grade of C or above.

MATH-105. College Algebra*. 3 Hours. Topics included in the course are quadratic equations, ratios, proportions and variation, complex numbers, determinants, and elimination theory and inequalities. Prerequisite: A minimum score of 44 on the Algebra Test of the COMPASS or credit in Intermediate Algebra with a grade of C or above.

MATH-106. Trigonometry*. 3 Hours. This course is an introduction to trigonometry for students of various majors. Topics included in this course are law of sines, law of cosines, and the Pythagorean Theorem. Prerequisite: A minimum score of 44 on the College Algebra Test of the COMPASS or credit in College Algebra with a grade of C or above.

MATH-115. Calculus with Analytic Geometry I*. 5 Hours. This course is a study of derivatives and integrals with applications. Prerequisite: Trigonometry with a grade of C or above.

MATH-117. Introduction to Analytic Processes. 3 Hours. This course employs the concepts of function, limit, derivative, integral and related topics. This three-hour course is designed for the non-mathematics or non-engineering majors; pre-calculus for business majors. Prerequisite: College Algebra with a grade of C
or above.

MATH-120. Calculus with Analytic Geometry II. 5 Hours. This course treats integration techniques, series, polar coordinates and vector applications. Prerequisite: Calculus with Analytic Geometry I with a grade of C or above.

MATH-201. Calculus with Analytic Geometry III. 3 Hours. This course treats the multi-variable concepts of partial derivatives and multiple integrals, vector valued functions and line integrals. Prerequisite: Calculus with Analytic Geometry II with a grade of C or above.

MATH-202. Differential Equations. 3 Hours. This course treats the various types of solutions of differential equations. Prerequisite: Calculus with Analytic Geometry III with a grade of C or above.

MATH-250. Elementary Statistics. 3 Hours. This course is an introduction to statistics for students of various majors. Topics included in this course are analysis of data, discrete and continuous distributions, sampling and statistical inference. Prerequisite: Intermediate Algebra with a grade of C or above. *Completion of the COMPASS Test is required for students prior to enrolling in their first math course. ACT, ASSET or SAT scores are also accepted.

MUSC-107. Class Piano. 1 Hour. Class instruction in Keyboard. Instruction in piano is designed to develop musicianship and technical proficiency, and to further the ability to sight read and to assimilate music  without guidance. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

MUSC-109. Instrumental Combo Ensemble. 2 Hours. This is an advanced performance-oriented course dealing with all aspects of small group instrumental performance. Styles of music will include but are not limited to: jazz, rock, pop, funk, and ska. Students will have several on- and off-campus performance opportunities throughout the semester.

MUSC-110. West African Drum Ensemble. 2 Hours. This course is designed to enable the student to gain greater appreciation and understanding of music of Sub-Saharan Africa, primarily West Africa. Students will prepare and perform traditional West African rhythms. Students will engage in community education through campus performances and various outreach opportunities.

MUSC-111. Concert Choir. 1 Hour. The Concert Choir sings many styles of choral literature from the Baroque Era to the present, and a public concert culminates each semester. This course is open to all students who enjoy singing and will enable them to better understand and appreciate the aesthetics of  choral music. May be taken for credit four times.

MUSC-112. Wind Ensemble. 2 Hours. This course explores all areas of wind band literature. It is created to improve technical playing, overall musicianship, work ethic, and motivation through challenging literature. The wind ensemble comprises of students on campus and is open to anyone who auditions. This ensemble performs a concert at the end of the semester and performs at area high schools across Southeast Kansas. This ensemble also serves as the basketball band for Coffeyville Community College. May be taken for credit two times. Prerequisite: Student needs to have a minimum two years of band experience or consent of instructor.

MUSC-113. Drum Ensemble. 1 Hour. This course is designed to enable the student to gain greater appreciation and understanding of the percussive arts, specifically through the marching percussion genre. Students will prepare and perform literature consisting of classic street beats, modern cadences, world  music styles, and stage pieces. Students will engage in community education through campus  performances and various outreach opportunities.

MUSC-114. Concert Band. 1 Hour. This course explores all areas of wind band literature. It is created to improve technical playing, overall musicianship, work ethic, and motivation through challenging literature. Membership in the course is drawn from students on campus and community members. This ensemble performs a concert at the end of the semester. Prerequisite: Student needs to have a minimum two years of band experience or consent of instructor.

MUSC-115. Instrumental Ensemble. 1 Hour. This is a small ensemble open to all college students who are qualified instrumentalists. The group prepares and performs music primarily suited for the composition of the group. May be taken for credit four times. Prerequisite: Minimum two years band experience and consent of the instructor.

MUSC-116. Marching Band. 2 Hours. An instrumental music unit emphasizing performances, drilling and coordination of drills with suitable music as the basis of the course. May be taken for credit two times. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Student needs to have a minimum two years of band experience.

MUSC-117. Applied Music. 1 Hour. Private instruction in Piano, Voice, Brass, Percussion, Woodwind, and Conducting will be offered. May be taken for credit four times. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

MUSC-118. Sight Singing and Ear Training I. 3 Hours. This course is designed for students who plan to major in music. It begins with an introduction to musicianship to help students learn to read music with a particular emphasis on the basic skills of reading music at sight and the mental recognition of phrases and melodies so they can be transcribed to staff paper. The course includes singing and dictation of rhythms in simple and compound meters, scales and diatonic melodies; study and analysis of representative music literature are included.

MUSC-119. Sight Singing and Ear Training II. 3 Hours. This course is a continuation of aural skill training with introduction to modulating melodies and elementary harmonic dictations, with studies of related music literature. Keyboard work will include the playing of major scales using key signatures. Prerequisite: Sight Singing and Ear Training I.

MUSC-120. Vocal Ensemble. 1 Hour. The singers in this ensemble are selected by audition. This ensemble performs more contemporary literature and utilizes choreography in its performances. May be taken for credit four times.

MUSC-122. Music Appreciation. 3 Hours. This course intends to develop a capacity for critical listening and an appreciation for the various musical styles. Special attention is given to works from the standard musical repertoire of the Renaissance, Baroque, Classical, Romantic and Contemporary eras of music history. This class is designed exclusively for the non-music major.

MUSC-123. Music Theory I. 3 Hours. The content of this course includes the study of major and minor scales, key signatures, triads of the principal harmonies and basic rhythmic structure. Notational practices, partwriting and manuscript writing are included. The course is grounded in the basic tonal functions of the common practice period.

MUSC-124. Music Theory II. 3 Hours. The second semester theory course resumes the study of the common practice period, including root position triads, their doubling, spacing and connection of first and second inversion triads; phrase structure and cadences; progressions; non-harmonic tones; dominant and nondominant seventh chords and secondary dominants. Prerequisite: Music Theory I.

MUSC-125. Caribean Ensemble. 2 Hours. This course is designed to enable the student to gain greater appreciation and understanding of music of the Caribbean. Students will prepare and perform traditional Caribbean music and styles including but not limited to Pop, Reggae, and Calypso. Students will engage in community education through campus performances and various outreach opportunities

MUSC-127. Fundamentals of Music Review. 3 Hours. This course will prepare the student for the music  theory courses (I-IV) by increasing students' music analysis skills.

MUSC-128. Aural Skills and Theory I & II. 4 Hours. Beginning to midterm: The course is designed for students who plan to major in music. Strong abilities in sight-reading music will be tested before enrollment in this class. The course includes singing and dictation of rhythms in simple and compound meters. Scales, and diatonic melodies; study and analysis of representative music literature are also included. The content of this course includes the study of major and minor scales, key signatures, triads of the principal  harmonies and basic rhythmic structure. Notational practices, partwriting and manuscript writing are included. The course is grounded in the basic tonal functions of the common practice period. Midterm to final: Continuation of aural skill training with introduction to modulating melodies and elementary harmonic dictations, with studies of related music literature. Keyboard work will include the playing of major scales using key signatures. This course is the second course in a sequence of four sight singing and ear training courses designed for the student who is majoring in music. It is a continuation of the learning of musical skills taught in Sight Singing and Ear Training I. This course includes further sight singing and dictation of rhythms in simple and compound meters; diatonic intervals and scales, subdivision of beats in simple and compound meters; and intervals from the Dominant Seventh Chord. The second semester theory course resumes the study of the common practice period, including root position triads, their doubling, spacing and connection of the first and second inversion triads; phrase structure and cadences; progressions;  non-harmonic tones; dominant and nondominant seventh chords, and secondary dominants.

MUSC-180. Choreography. 2 Hours. This course will teach the student basic choreography dance steps and body movement. Students will learn choreography to a complete musical show. This course will require  much physical endurance and intense concentration. The purpose of this course is to add movement to enhance a choral performance. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor and chosen for Raven Soundsations.

MUSC-218. Advanced Sight Singing and Ear Training I. 3 Hours. Student's aural and reading abilities will be increasingly challenged by problems of rhythm, meter and pitch through specific exercises and studies of related musical literature. Prerequisite: Sight Singing and Ear Training II.

MUSC-219. Advanced Sight Singing and Ear Training II. 3 Hours. This course includes reading of two or more melodic lines, score reading and preparation, and aural analysis of melodies and harmonic progressions as played or sung. This course is the fourth course in a sequence of four sight singing and ear training courses designed for the student who is majoring in music and is recommended to be taken in conjunction with Music Theory IV. Prerequisite: Advanced Sight Singing and Ear Training I.

MUSC-223. Music Theory III. 3 Hours. This course continues the study of the common practice period including modulation to closely related keys, borrowed chords, augmented sixth chords, Neapolitan sixths, chromatic mediants, modulation to foreign keys, ninth, eleventh and thirteenth chords. Prerequisite: Music Theory II.

MUSC-224. Music Theory IV. 3 Hours. This course begins with a study of impressionistic composers, and is concluded with a study of twentieth century harmonic devices. Prerequisite: Music Theory III.

MUSC-228. Aural Skills and Theory III & IV. 4 Hours. Beginning to midterm: Students’ aural and reading abilities will be increasingly challenged by problems of rhythm, meter and pitch through specific exercises and studies of related musical literature. This course continues the study of the common practice period including modulation to closely related keys, borrowed chords, augmented sixth chords, Neapolitan sixths, chromatic mediants, modulation to foreign keys, ninth, eleventh, and thirteenth chords. Midterm to final: Reading of two or more melodic lines, score reading and preparation, and aural analysis of melodies and harmonic progressions as played or sung. This course is the fourth course in a sequence of four sight singing and ear training courses designed for the student who is majoring in music. It is a continuation of the learning of musical skills taught in Aural Skills and Theory I & II. This course includes material to further develop the students’ skills insight singing. This course begins with a study of impressionistic composers, and is concluded with a study of twentieth century harmonic devices. Prerequisite: Aural Skills and Theory I & II.

NALS-190. Introduction to Tribal Leadership. 3 Hours. This course provides an overview of the fundamentals, actions and characteristics of great leaders described in the academic literature. It focuses on the progression from self, effective group and team participation, leadership fundamentals leading to the creation of a legacy. Examples from successful businesses, the social sector, government and tribal entities and religious institutions are presented. The course also presents the fundamentals of collecting, evaluating and presenting ideas and information using a Socratic-thesis format necessary to leading effectively in a formal group setting.

PHYS-111. Introduction to Astronomy. 3 Hours. This is a course designed for the non-science major. Emphasis will be placed on fundamentals of astronomy and astrophysics, including history and  methodology.

PHYS-120. Physical Geology. 5 Hours. This course is designed to provide the student with an  understanding of the basic concepts of physical geology. The nature and properties of material composing the earth, the processes by which it is formed, altered, transported, and distorted, the distribution of this material, and the nature and development of landscape will be covered. The course includes three credit hours of lecture and two credit hours of lab.

PHYS-121. Historical Geology. 5 Hours. This course will focus on the history of the Earth from its formation within the Milky Way Galaxy to the evolution of Homo sapiens. It will be divided into two areas: physical development of the Earth and the biological development of the Earth. The course includes three credit hours of lecture and two credit hours of lab.

PHYS-203. College Physics I. 5 Hours. This is a theory and lab course which covers vectors, mechanics, simple harmonic motion and the Laws of Thermodynamics including Kinetic Theory. College algebra and trig skills are required. The course includes four credit hours of lecture and one credit hour of lab. Prerequisite: College Algebra or Trigonometry in high school or college.

PHYS-204. College Physics II. 5 Hours. This is a theory and lab course which continues with heat, thermodynamics, optics, electricity and magnetism and elements of modern physics. The course includes four credit hours of lecture and one credit hour of lab. Prerequisite: College Physics I.

PHYS-205. Physical Science. 5 Hours. This course is designed for students who need a physical science requirement, especially elementary education majors. Topics include astronomy, atmospheric science, geology and nuclear reactions.

PHYS-212. Physics Seminar. 2 Hours. This is a continuation of the introductory physics sequence in which the student will study more advanced topics of "modern" physics. Special emphasis is given to relativity, atomic and nuclear structure, and quantum mechanics. Additional topics in statistical mechanics, and solid state physics will be included as time allows Prerequisite: College Physics I and College Physics II or Engineering Physics I and Engineering Physics II.

PSYC-100. College Orientation I. 1 Hour. This required course is designed to help students make a successful transition to the community college.The students will recognize and appreciate the diversity while adjusting to the academic, social, cultural and civic awareness necessary for college and lifetime success.

PSYC-101. General Psychology. 3 Hours. This course is an introduction to the science of psychology with an emphasis on the principles which lead to a greater understanding of human behavior. A variety of laboratory experiences will be included in the course.

PSYC-102. Developmental Psychology. 3 Hours. The principles of growth and development in the physical, cognitive, social, emotional and personality aspects are covered. Application of current research in the actual world of infants, children, adolescents and adults will be emphasized. Prerequisite: General Psychology.

PSYC-104. College Success Strategies. 2 Hours. This course is designed to help students become more successful in college and in life. Students will learn strategies for creating greater academic, professional and personal success. Prerequisite: College Orientation I.

PSYC-107. College Orientation II. 1 Hour. College Orientation II (Capstone Experience) emphasizes aspects of many academic disciplines which affect the quality and conduct of human life. Topics include more focused practice in effective study and test-taking skills. This section of College Orientation II will focus on those English (reading/writing), math, critical thinking, and science skills needed to perform successfully on standardized achievement tests. A primary goal of College Orientation II (Capstone Experience) is to enhance student learning through online instruction. The course follows the same procedures and is subject to the same standards as other credit classes. Three subject areas (Reading/Writing/ Math) will have a module on WebCT for the student to complete. Prerequisite: Student will have completed College Orientation I, English Composition I, and 45 credit hours.

PSYC-120. Psychology of Human Adjustment. 3 Hours. A study of factors designed to promote personality characteristics that reflect mental health. Emphasis will be centered on the development of the positive aspect of personality rather than on the correction of negative, undesirable characteristics.

PSYC-125. Human Sexuality. 3 Hours. This course is an introduction to the science of human sexuality with an emphasis on the principles which lead to a greater understanding of human behavior in relation to human sexuality. A variety of laboratory experiences will be included in the course.

PSYC-201. Problems in Psychology. 1 Hour. A course designed to meet the special educational needs of individuals majoring in the Social Sciences. The course uses the individual research, guided reading and/or class lecture methods of instruction. Course content varies according to the special interests or unique needs of the students. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

SOCI-101. Introduction to Sociology. 3 Hours. This course is designed for both the general student and the behavioral science major. Basic concepts, terms and works of prominent figures who have contributed to sociology are included.

SOCI-124. Introduction to Criminal Justice. 3 Hours. This is an introductory course designed to give an overview of the various components of the justice system. This course is designed for men and women at the beginning of their academic careers and for those who are working in the field of criminal justice and want to broaden their knowledge and advance professionally. Criminal justice is a practical science exploring the roles of law enforcement, the courts, corrections and criminal behavior and their relationships within the larger framework of public policy.

SOCI-201. American Social Problems. 3 Hours. This course examines the social problems which confront today's society. Prerequisite: Introduction to Sociology or permission of instructor.

SOCI-290. Problems in Sociology. 2 Hours. Independent research or a reading program in some field of the student's interest is used in this course which is taught in specially arranged conferences with the instructor. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

SPCH-111. Public Speaking. 3 Hours. This is a survey course in communication emphasizing platform speaking, public deliberations and critical thinking. The course focuses upon public speaking, evaluation and the practical application of those experiences.

SPCH-121. Public Speaking: Honors. 3 Hours. This is a survey course in communication emphasizing platform speaking, public deliberations and critical thinking. The course focuses upon public speaking, evaluation and the practical application of those experiences. It is designed to foster a more sophisticated level of skill development and theoretical understanding of the concepts presented in Public Speaking by using teaching strategies that focus upon the skills of Honors students. Emphasis will be placed on different
assignments that promote a deeper understanding of the concepts taught in the basic course.

Public Speaking: Honors will have more group interaction exercises which lead to discovery learning. Speeches will be practiced in small groups in order to get feedback on content and development. Students in this class will also have a chance to read and discuss essays, articles and famous speeches.  Prerequisite: Student must be a member of the CCC Honors Program or have permission from the Program Coordinator.

SPCH-211. Interpersonal and Group Communications. 3 Hours. This is a survey course in communication emphasizing informal and organizational communication skills and strategies. This course further surveys theory and research related to interpersonal communication. The course focuses on effectively managing personal and professional relationships.

THTR-160. Theatre Appreciation. 3 Hours. This course is a basic approach to the what, why and how of theatre. The course provides an introduction to the history of the theatre as reflected in architecture, design, playwriting and acting of the major periods.

THTR-161. Stagecraft. 3 Hours. This course is an introduction to stage scenecraft techniques: basic carpentry, scene painting, props, lighting, sound, design, and direction through laboratory experience mixed with lecture. Students will work on construction and operating crews, handle business details under supervision and generally participate in the operation of the college theatre.

THTR-162. Workshop in Theatre Design. 3 Hours. This course offers practical experience in areas of play production other than directing, acting and construction. Areas are properties, publicity, makeup, costuming and house management.

THTR-163. Theatre Production. 1 Hour. Credit is earned by participation in school theatrical and assigned crew presentations and granted upon recommendation of instructor of dramatics. May be taken for credit four times. Prerequisite: Required of all Theatre Scholarship students.

THTR-164. Fundamentals of Acting I. 3 Hours. This course is a beginning acting class for majors and  nonmajors in theatre. Students will learn and perform four contrasting monologues during the course of the class. The course is designed to further acting skills in several areas, including characterization, body  movement, make-up, costuming, voice and stage techniques. An acting recital will be held during finals and is open to the public.

THTR-165. Directing Project. 2 Hours. This course offers practical experience in the area of play production. It is designed to provide the student training in directing techniques. Practical application of the presented theatre principles will be required. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

THTR-166. Improvisation. 3 Hours. This is a theatre course designed to provide the student training in body movement, voice techniques, stage presence, spontaneity and acting techniques. Practical application of the presented theatre principles is required.

THTR-167. Stage Movement. 3 Hours. This course is designed to further acting skills in regards to stage movement. These acting skills include characterization, body movement, voice and stage techniques.

THTR-168. Theatre Internship. 1-2 Hours. This course consists of practical work experience in the theatre performance, or technical theatre in the sceneshop of the college theatre. Students and their job supervisors will report on the students' hours worked and their experiences in technical or performance theatre, emphasizing the development of workplace skills. The course will present ideas and practical knowledge as well as provide the how's and why's of technical and performance theatre positions. Prerequisite: Permission
of instructor.

THTR-170. Theatre Practicum. 1 Hour. Credit is earned by participation in a College stage production. Performer must be cast in a role that will meet 45 clock hours of rehearsal. Technicians may also take this course for technical areas, as long as they meet the specific hours needed. A log sheet must be turned in  and have dates and entries of rehearsals and performances attended. May be taken for credit four times.

THTR-171. Theatre Production II. 1 Hour. Credit is earned by participation in school theatrical and assigned crew presentations and granted upon recommendation of instructor of dramatics. May be taken for credit four times. Prerequisite: Required of all Theatre Scholarship students.

THTR-172. Theatre Production III. 1 Hour. Credit is earned by participation in school theatrical and assigned crew presentations and granted upon recommendation of instructor of dramatics. May be taken for credit four times. Prerequisite: Required of all Theatre Scholarship students.

THTR-173. Theatre Production IV. 1 Hour. Credit is earned by participation in school theatrical and assigned crew presentations and granted upon recommendation of instructor of dramatics. May be taken for credit four times. Prerequisite: Required of all Theatre Scholarship students.

THTR-175. Theatre Appreciation: Honors. 3 Hours. This course is an introductory approach to the what, why and how of theatre. The course focuses upon an introduction to the history of theatre as identified in architecture, design, playwriting and acting of the major periods. It also focuses on application of theatre criticism and theory of plays through written analysis. It is designed to foster a more challenging,  sophisticated level of skill development and theoretical understanding of theatre concepts by using field trips, guest artists, written papers, review, play readings and theatre history lectures. This class uses teaching strategies that focus upon the skills of Honors students. Prerequisite: Student must be a member of the CCC Honors Program.

THTR-200. Playwriting. 3 Hours. This course is an introductory class for beginning and experienced writers of plays, for theatre majors and those students studying to be playwrights. Students will learn specific techniques, practical exercises, candid exploration of famous plays and methods from award-winning playwrights during the course of this class. This course is designed to work with the basic building blocks of dramatic structure, study the exploration of developing character, analyze the elements of good dialogue writing, research the different methods of how to get plays published and explore different marketing tools to make a play a best seller. A playwright’s recital of original work from the class will be held during finals and is open to the public.

THTR-220. Voice and Diction. 3 Hours. This course is a study of vocal mechanisms, phonetics and related exercises to improve articulation, pronunciation and expressive intonation. The course also covers the International Phonetic Alphabet and its uses in vocal performance. Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Acting I.

THTR-240. Sketch Comedy I. 3 Hours. This course will provide students with an overview of modern improvisation techniques. These core skills are useful to performers, instructors and directors. Special  emphasis will be placed on techniques used to build an ensemble and the use of improv as a tool to boost creativity. Students will learn how improv can be used to help the performer with auditions and  performances. Students will also learn the various techniques needed to create written comedy sketches for performance. Prerequisite: Improvisation I.

THTR-245. Sketch Comedy II. 3 Hours. This course will challenge students to continue their comic writing abilities. Comic situations from classic and contemporary theatre pieces will be studied. Comic techniques will be applied to current writings and reviewed in dramatic comedies. Comedy techniques will also be studied by reading and analyzing various playwrights throughout history. Prerequisite: Sketch Comedy I.

THTR-250. Musical Theatre Audition. 3 Hours. This course is a beginning musical theatre class for majors and non-majors in theatre, music, and musical theatre. Students will learn and perform two contrasting monologues and two contrasting songs during the course of the class. It is designed to teach auditioning skills for those students auditioning for musical theatre, theatre or music departments at the four year universities or colleges. The course will also require the students to learn how to put a professional performance resume together along with a portfolio.

THTR-264. Fundamentals of Acting II. 3 Hours. This course is designed to further acting skills in several areas, including characterization, body movement, make-up, costuming, voice and stage techniques.

THTR-265. Stagecraft II. 3 Hours. This is a course designed to further stagecraft skills in several areas, including design of a set, experience construction methods and techniques and business through laboratory mixed with lecture. Students will work on construction and operating crews, handle business details under supervision and participate in the operation of the College theatre. Prerequisite: Stagecraft.

THTR-266. Improvisation II. 3 Hours. This is a theatre course designed to provide the student advanced  training in body movement, voice techniques, stage presence, spontaneity, acting techniques and character development. Practical application of the presented theatre principles is required. Prerequisite: Improvisation.

THTR-270. Acting Styles. 3 Hours. This course is an advanced class for majors in theatre. Students will learn and perform three period monologues and scenes during the course of the class. It is designed to help the student work with verse, including characterization, body movement, voice and stage techniques. An acting recital will be held during finals and is open to the public. Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Acting I and
Fundamentals of Acting II.