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Globe on top of BooksHumanities Transfer Degree Program

The Humanities provide general education courses to expose students to a greater understanding, appreciation, and enjoyment for our culture, resources, and environment.

A student’s class choices should be planned with the requirements of the transfer institution in mind.  See your advisor for enrollment information and transfer institution requirements.

Most students who decide to major in Humanities at a four-year institution will plan a course of study that will lead to an Associate in Arts Degree.

To complete an associate degree the program emphasis credit hours and the general education credit hours, which must be taken from the list approved by the General Education Committee, must total at least 64 credit hours.

Description of Courses

ARTS-155. Cinematic Traditions: Film Genres. 3 Hours. A critical survey of the accomplishments of artists and craftspeople in the relatively short history of
film making, a record of creative collaborations which changed critical and commercial perceptions of visual
art and storytelling will be featured in this course.

HUMN-104. Introduction to Philosophy. 3 Hours. This course is a survey of the main problems in philosophy as presented in the writings of major philosophers. The course will present a study of the intellectual  problems of our times as well as draw upon the knowledge and inquiries of past contemporaries. Philosophical concepts and theories will be explored by using applications of present social trends, issues and problems.

HUMN-120. Issues in Philosophy. 3 Hours. This course will examine the philosophical positions underlying contemporary issues, and the relationship of those issues to our inherited and diverse intellectual tradition. The emphasis is placed on understanding relevant philosophical issues, enabling the students to formulate their own informed conclusions.

HUMN-125. Humanities I. 1 Hour. This course enables the student to study the disciplines that serve as outlets for human expression. Opportunities will be provided to gain insight into human communication efforts in art, drama, music, dance and literature. The student will become acquainted with these areas through lectures, demonstrations, exhibits, concerts and selfstudy. May be taken for credit three times.

HUMN-130. History and Development of Motion Pictures. 3 Hours. This course is designed to provide a critical survey of motion pictures as a distinctive form and as a medium of expression and communication, with attention given to silent films, early talking pictures and cinema innovators from the origins of the  motion picture medium.

HUMN-135. Humanities II. 2 Hours. This is a continuation of the study begun in Humanities I including a second series of lectures, demonstrations, exhibits and readings. Prerequisite: Humanities I.

HUMN-151. Comparative Humanities. 3 Hours. Comparative Humanities is designed to bring the humanities into focus in relation to the modern world through lectures, demonstrations, readings and field trips. The Humanities are the disciplines that provide people with resources for engaging in humanistic concerns and leading a satisfying existence. They include the arts, religion, philosophy, architecture, history and those aspects of social and physical sciences which affect the quality and conduct of human life. A primary goal of Comparative Humanities is to enhance student learning through on-site instruction. While certain classes should remain on campus, others may benefit from the opportunities provided by travel. Course may be repeated.

HUMN-153. Comparative Humanities: Honors. 3 Hours. This course is designed to bring the humanities into focus in relation to the modern world through lectures, demonstrations, readings and field trips. The Humanities are the disciplines that provide people with resources for engaging in humanistic concerns and
leading a satisfying existence. They include the arts, religion, philosophy, architecture, history and those
aspects of social and physical sciences which affect the quality and conduct of human life. A primary goal of Comparative Humanities is to enhance student learning through on-site instruction. Our primary focus will
be the current Phi Theta Kappa Honors Study Topic. Prerequisite: Selection for the CCC Honors Program.

HUMN-156. Honors Seminar. 1 Hour. The purpose of the seminar is to focus on topics of an interdisciplinary nature to stimulate critical thinking. All seminar classes will have different content. Discussions, guest lecturers, along with extensive reading and writing will be the chosen methods of instruction. Prerequisite:
Selection for the CCC Honors Program.

HUMN-180. Introduction to Ethics. 3 Hours. This course is an introductory study of the nature of morality,
moral judgments, moral knowledge and the relation of morality to religion. The course will take an integrated
approach, combining the appeal and strengths of the moral problems approach with classical texts, thus
providing a solid foundation in moral theory and moral reasoning.

HUMN-208. World Religions. 3 Hours. This course is a meaningful and thoughtful approach to the study of religions, relevant for humanities and cultural studies. The series explores modern religious practices and interpretations around the world: Buddhism, Judaism, Catholicism, Taoism, Zen, Islam and others. Prerequisite: English Composition I.

HUMN-218. Logic and Critical Thinking. 3 Hours. This course is a basic introduction to both deductive and inductive reasoning. Emphasis is placed on identifying, analyzing and constructing arguments. It examines
the logical structure of English sentences, determining validity, examining premises, and using a symbolic
system which models logical relations among sentences. Special emphasis will be placed upon the logical
appraisal of everyday arguments and the analysis of value arguments.

HUMN-225. Humanities III. 3 Hours. Humanities is designed to enable the student to study the disciplines
which pursue humanistic concerns, the relationship between the humanities, the arts and the sciences. Traditionally, these have included the fine arts, literature, drama, philosophy and religion, but the new humanist is greatly interested in anthropology, history, psychology and those aspects of the sciences and math which have direct bearing upon the qualities of human life. The student will become acquainted with these areas through lectures, demonstrations, exhibits and textual materials.

HUMN-235. Humanities IV. 3 Hours. Humanities is designed to enable the student to study the disciplines
which pursue humanistic concerns, the relationship between the humanities, the arts and the sciences. Traditionally, these have included the fine arts, literature, drama, philosophy and religion, but the new humanist is greatly interested in anthropology, history, psychology and those aspects of the sciences and math which have direct bearing upon the qualities of human life. The student will become acquainted with these areas through lectures, demonstrations, exhibits and textual materials.

HUMN-253. Comparative Humanities II: Honors. 3 Hours. This course is designed to bring the humanities
into focus in relation to the modern world through lectures and readings The primary focus will be the current Phi Theta Kappa Honors Study Topic. Readings, lectures and writings will be the focus of this in-depth Humanities class. Prerequisite: Selection for the CCC Honors Program and a passing grade in Comparative
Humanities: Honors.