Fire Science Curriculum Guide and Course Descriptions

The Fire Science program prepares graduates for entry-level firefighter positions with various emergency organizations, including fire departments, industry emergency response teams, and first responder agencies.  The program allows student to complete the International Fire Science Training Association (IFSTA) Firefighter I and II certifications, complete an Associate degree, and prepare for transfer to a bachelor degree program at an area university.  This program is designed to prepare students for careers in fire fighting, fire investigation, consulting, industrial safety, fire engineering and fire prevention.  The program requires a minimum of 2 years to complete.  A minimum of 64 college credits are required for successful completion of the Fire Science Associate of Applied Science degree program.

Required Fire Science Courses

    Credit Hours
FIRE-100 Fire Service Orientation and Terminology 3
FIRE-110 Firefighter I 5
FIRE-130 Firefighter II 4
FIRE-120 Hazardous Materials - Awareness 1
FIRE-121 Hazardous Materials - Operations 3
FIRE-140 Introduction to Fire Origin and Cause 3
FIRE-145 Fundamentals of Fire Prevention 3
FIRE-150 Building Construction Related to Fire Science 3
EMTP-136 Emergency Medical Technician 11
EMTP-116 Emergency Defensive Driving 1
Fire Science Elective Hours (see list below) 9
     
Total Program Credit Hours 46

 

Elective Fire Science Courses: (Must take three of the following courses):

    Credit Hours
FIRE-210 Strategic & Tactical Considerations 3
FIRE-155 Fire Detection and Suppression Systems 3
FIRE-230 Industrial Firefighting 3
FIRE-160 Pumping Apparatus Driver/Operator 3
FIRE-170 Fire Service Hydraulics & Water Supply 3
FIRE-171 Fire Service Hydraulics & Water Supply Lab 3
FIRE-200 Rescue Practices 3
FIRE-201 Rescue Practices Lab 3
FIRE-190 Wildland Firefighting 3
FIRE-180 Fire Investigator 3

 

To complete an associate degree the program emphasis credit hours and the general education credit hours, which must be taken from the list approved by the General Education Committee, must total at least 64 credit hours (minimum of 65 credit hours for Fire Science program majors).

The Associate of Applied Science Degree in Fire Science requires 18 general education credit hours in addition to completing the Fire Science curriculum detailed above. Associate of Applied Science Degree Requirements.

Description of Courses

FIRE-100. Fire Service Orientation and Terminology. 3 Hours. The purpose of this course is to acquaint students and firefighters with the history, traditions, terminology, organization, and operation of the fire service. Students and firefighters will learn the organizational structure of the fire department and also learn how the fire department interacts with other local, state, and federal agencies. The course contains information about typical job and operation descriptions that should provide insight into the inner workings of the fire service. The student and firefighter will learn the meaning of and use correctly the extensive fire service terminology glossary. The overall purpose of the fire service is to protect life and property from the effects of fire and other hazards.

FIRE-110. Firefighter I. 5 Hours. This course addresses the basic requirements of a person who wishes to serve as Fire Fighter Level I as defined in National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Standard 1001, Standard for Fire Fighter Professional Qualifications. The basic skills and job performance requirements covered will reflect either what a firefighter actually does on the job or should be expected to do. A Fire Fighter I is a person who is minimally trained to function safely and effectively as a member of a fire fighting team under direct supervision. This course will utilize lassroom instruction, discussion, and exploration as well as performance based skill development in practical exercises with fire apparatus and firefighting tools on the fire grounds.

FIRE-120. Hazardous Materials – Awareness. 1 Hour. This courses is designed to meet the requirements for National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), and Office of Domestic Preparedness (ODP) first responders Awareness Level. Awareness level first responders are those persons who, in the course of their normal duties, could be first on the scene of an emergency involving hazardous materials and are expected to recognize the presence of hazardous materials, protect themselves, call for trained personnel, and secure the scene. The course addresses the first responder’s responsibilities to recognize the hazardous material and take the appropriate initial actions when hazardous materials spills or releases are encountered. Its scope is limited to giving detailed information about the initial defensive operations. Additionally, it addresses the control of hazardous materials from a safe distance and requesting the assistance of trained hazardous materials technicians who have specialized training.

FIRE-121. Hazardous Materials – Operations. 3 Hours. This courses is designed to meet the requirements for National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), and Office of Domestic Preparedness (ODP) first responders Operations Level. Operations level first responders are those persons who respond to releases or potential releases of hazardous materials as part of the initial response to the incident for the purpose of protecting nearby persons, the environment, or property from the effects of the release, and who are expected to respond in a defensive fashion to control the release from a safe distance and keep it from spreading. Also addressed are the procedures to collect hazard and response information from MSDS; CHEMTREC/CANUTEC/SETIQ; local state, and federal authorities, and shipper/manufacturer contacts. Then using that information, analyze the hazardous materials incident to determine the magnitude of the problem and request the assistance of trained hazardous materials technicians
who have specialized training.

FIRE-130. Firefighter II. 4 Hours. This course addresses the basic requirements of a person who wishes to serve as a Fire Fighter Level II as defined in National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Standard 1001, Standard for Fire Fighter Professional Qualifications. The basic skills and job performance requirements covered will reflect either what a firefighter actually does on the job or should be expected to do. A Fire Fighter II is a person who may operate under general supervision and may be expected to lead a group of equally or lesser trained personnel through the performance of a specified task. This course will utilize classroom instruction, discussion, and exploration as well as performance based skill development in practical exercises with fire apparatus and firefighting tools on the fire grounds.

FIRE-140. Introduction to Fire Origin & Cause. 3 Hours. The purpose of this course is to provide a guide to emergency response personnel (ERP) who are charged with trying to determine the origin and cause of a fire. It is intended to provide company officers, firefighters, and other emergency personnel with information that will assist them in this process. Included are guidelines for ERP’s who are on the scene during and immediately after a fire. The information generated by the work of the initial responders is critical to the conduct of an accurate fire investigation. The information gathered can be used to determine the origin of the fire and how it started. Additionally, an investigation can fix responsibility for the fire either as an accidental event or one that was intentionally set. From the initial investigation, the information gathered can form the foundation for sound courtroom testimony in both civil and criminal trials brought before the court. The outcomes of these legal proceedings help reduce the potential for additional incidents resulting from arson by removing the responsible party from society, or by eliminating a defective device or process from general use.

FIRE-145. Fundamentals of Fire Prevention. 3 Hours. This course addresses the organization, methodology, and processes of fire prevention. Methods and skills are demonstrated and developed for conducting inspections as well as surveying and mapping procedures. Upon successful completion of the course the students will be equipped to determine and recognize fire and life safety hazards, solution and correction of hazards, and when appropriate, enforcing the solution. It explores and emphasizes the need for good public relations and community motivation in fire prevention and overall life safety-injury prevention programs.

FIRE-150. Building Construction Related to Fire Science. 3 Hours. This course is intended to furnish the
firefighter with basic information about how buildings are designed and constructed. This information will aid in decision-making related to fire prevention and fire control. Whether the firefighter’s duties include studying and enforcing fire codes, inspecting buildings, developing pre-incident plans, fighting fires, directing fireground operations, overseeing firefighter safety, or investigating the origin and cause of fires, a thorough understanding of building construction principles and practices will enable the firefighter to make better, safe, and more timely decisions to protect people and property from potential as well as actual fires.

FIRE-155. Fire Detection & Suppression Systems. 3 Hours. This course is designed to provide up to date instruction and information on fire detection and suppression systems. It is aimed at municipal firefighters, industrial fire protection personnel, and all others seeking additional information in this area.The course contains instruction and information on automatic sprinkler systems, hose standpipe systems, and fixed fire pump installations. Portable fire extinguishers, fixed special agent extinguishing systems, and fire alarm and detection systems are also addressed. Description and explanation on the design, operation, and inspection of these systems and equipment is provided. This course is intended to familiarize the fire service and other interested personnel with hazard recognition, extinguishing agents, detection and alarm systems, fixed extinguishing systems, fire behavior, and water supplies for extinguishing systems.

FIRE-160. Pumping Apparatus Driver/Operator. 3 Hours. This course details the important responsibilities of firefighters who are assigned to drive and operate a fire department vehicle that is equipped with a fire pump. The purpose of the course is to present general principles of pump operations, along with the application of those principles wherever feasible. It is also meant to guide driver/operators in the proper operation and care of apparatus. This course serves as an overview of qualities and skills needed by driver/operator, safe driving techniques, types of pumping apparatus, positioning of apparatus to maximize efficiency and water supply, fire pump theory and operation, hydraulic calculations, water supply considerations, relay pumping principles, water supply procedures, foam systems operation, and apparatus maintenance and testing.

FIRE-170. Fire Service Hydraulics & Water Supply. 3 Hours. The purpose of this course is to allow firefighters to become more professional in the area of fire service hydraulics. This course will not only explain how various equipment or equations work, but why they work and why firefighters need to know them. The information contained in this course is designed to meet the objectives put forth in the model course outlined for Fire Protection Hydraulics and Water Supply as established by the Fire and Emergency Services Higher Education (FESHE) initiative led by the United States Fire Administration (USFA). Every effort will be made in this course to demonstrate and explain how equipment and theory have benefited from modern technology. The firefighter student will be instructed in the most modern, efficient, and simplest manner of performing the task at hand. In some cases the older methods will also be demonstrated and explained to provide a detailed understanding of the physical characteristics of water and the scientific principle of its movement.

FIRE-171. Fire Service Hydraulics & Water Supply Lab. 3 Hours. The purpose of this course is to allow firefighters to become more professional in the area of fire service hydraulics. This course will not only explain how various equipment or equations work, but why they work and why firefighters need to know them. The information contained in this course is designed to meet the objectives put forth in the model course outlined for Fire Protection Hydraulics and Water Supply as established by the Fire and Emergency Services Higher Education (FESHE) initiative led by the United States Fire Administration (USFA). Every effort will be made in this course to demonstrate and explain how equipment and theory have benefited from modern technology. The firefighter student will be instructed in the most modern, efficient, and simplest manner of performing the task at hand. In some cases the older methods will also be demonstrated and explained to provide a detailed understanding of the physical characteristics of water and the scientific principle of its movement.

FIRE-180. Fire Investigator. 3 Hours. This course addresses the basic skills needed to conduct fire investigations. Successful methods are demonstrated for conducting legal fire investigations that culminate, when appropriate, in prosecution for arson. Upon successful completion of the course, the students will be equipped to identify the origin and cause of a fire, and conduct a technically and legally sound investigation. Subjects covered include behavior of fire, health and safety, determining point of origin, accidental and incendiary fire cause determination, motivation of the fire-setter, fire scene investigation and follow-up techniques, fire protection systems, vehicle fires, fatal fires, incendiary devices, legal aspects, interview techniques, evidence, and report writing.

FIRE-190. Wildland Firefighting for Structural Firefighters. 3 Hours. This course is intended to furnish the firefighter with basic information needed to effectively perform the various tasks involved in wildland firefighting. Primarily firefighters whose central focus is fighting structure fires, but who are also responsible for protecting wildland (forest) and wildland/urban interface areas. Safe and effective initial response to wildland fires requires basic training in wildland firefighting, such as wildland fire behavior, suppression methods, tools, safety, and communications. In addition to basic knowledge, skills, and experience, wildland firefighters must learn to use specialized techniques, tools, and equipment in order to mitigate wildland fire emergencies. An effective wildland fire fighting incident response requires that wildland firefighters be familiar with various types of  equipment and the different features of the terrain and topography. This course indentifies critical wildland firefighting skills that structural firefighters need to be safe and effective in an initial attack on a wildland fire in their jurisdiction or when working with state and federal wildland firefighters.

FIRE-200. Rescue Practices. 3 Hours. This course is designed to develop and teach essential rope rescue
skills, knowledge, and techniques required for the student to function as an effective and competent rescuer in a high angle or vertical environment. The instruction will cover rope safety, equipment, knots craft, basic and advanced rigging, belaying techniques, repelling, rescue skills, self/victim rescue, team organization and system analysis. The course will incorporate classroom instruction using lecture, discussion, demonstration, and hands-on activities/applications with multiple practice sessions. The course will incorporate a field  instruction lab where students will learn, practice and demonstrate rigging, rope rescue skills, team based rescue, rope safety, anchoring, belay techniques, repelling, and victim rescue. In the lab environment the student will demonstrate and become proficient in the skills and techniques required to conduct rope rescue operations.

FIRE-201. Rescue Practices Lab. 3 Hours. This course is designed to develop and teach essential rope
rescue skills, knowledge, and techniques required for the student to function as an effective and competent rescuer in a high angle or vertical environment. The instruction will cover rope safety, equipment, knots craft, basic and advanced rigging, belaying techniques, repelling, rescue skills, self/victim rescue, team organization and system analysis. The course will incorporate classroom instruction using lecture, discussion, demonstration, and hands-on activities/applications with multiple practice sessions. The course will incorporate a field instruction lab where students will learn, practice and demonstrate rigging, rope rescue skills, team based rescue, rope safety, anchoring, belay techniques, repelling, and victim rescue. In the lab environment the student will demonstrate and become proficient in the skills and techniques required to conduct rope rescue operations.

FIRE-210. Strategic & Tactical Considerations on the Fire Grounds. 3 Hours. This course is designed as an in-depth analysis in the principles of fire control through the utilization of personnel, equipment, and extinguishing agents on the fire ground. A systems approach to guide the firefighters and driver operators who aspire to the position of company officer, company officers and for training officers responsible for teaching and developing officers and officer candidates through the process of problem identification and solution response. From pre-incident planning to incident scene control, this course addresses the tools for response in numerous situations including among others, building collapse, high rise fires, strip malls, and large commercial buildings. Building construction is examined including the basic types and their strength, weaknesses, fire resistance and collapse potential. The Command Sequence method for problem identification and strategy tactics is utilized as well as the Cue-Based Decision-Making, taught at the National Fire Academy, to describe incident scene problem-solving.

FIRE-220. Fire & Emergency Service Instructor I. 3 Hours. The purpose of this course is to provide fire and emergency services instructor candidates with basic instructional knowledge. This knowledge is necessary to develop skills for preparing and presenting training for personnel of fire and emergency service organizations through a variety of instructional methods. Fire and Emergency Service Instructor Level I will be responsible for assembling course materials, delivering a prepared lesson plan, managing instructional resources, using instructional aids and evaluation tools, and reviewing and adapting lesson plans to meet the training and instructional needs of the target group. Fire and Emergency Service Instructor Level I also prepares and maintains accurate training records in accordance with the requirements of the jurisdiction.